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Casting a Centrepin Reel

Casting a Centrepin Reel

Loop cast is great for beginners and when fishing in tight quarters wherethere is not enough room for a back cast. A single loop cast can reach 25-30 feet, while a double loop cast has a range of 35-45 feet. With enough practice anglers can pull up to 5 loops of line (one on each finger) and increase their range to 75+ feet.

1. Take a loop of line from above the first guide and draw it back to the reel.

2. Release the loop of line as the rod casts out the float.

The Double Loop Cast

1. Take a loop of line from above the first and second guide and draw them both back to the reel.

2. Release the loops of line in sequence as the rod casts out the float.

Casting a Centrepin Reel

LOOP CAST

Loop Cast

This cast is great for beginners and when fishing in tight quarters where there is not enough room for a back cast. A single loop cast can reach 25-30 feet, while a double loop cast has a range of 35-45 feet. With enough practice anglers can pull up to 5 loops of line (one on each finger) and increase their range to 75+ feet.

1. Take a loop of line from above the first guide and draw it back to the reel.

2. Release the loop of line as the rod casts out the float.

The Double Loop Cast

1. Take a loop of line from above the first and second guide and draw them both back to the reel.

2. Release the loops of line in sequence as the rod casts out the float.

SIDE CAST

Side Cast

This is the most popular casting method in the Great Lakes region. It is fairly easy to master and achieves good distance. The side cast causes line twist and will require the line to be changed frequently. To maximize casting distance, it is best to to fill the spool to within 1/4" from the edge of the lip.

1. Using your left thumb, take the line from below the first guide, and pull it to a right angle (90°) from the reel.

2. Use the right hand to prevent the line from falling off the face of the reel.

3. Release the line with the right hand while casting the float out. The left hand must remain at a perfect right angle (90°) from the reel and allow the line to flow through the fingers.

Note: The left hand may also be held in the reverse position (the thumb pointing towards the caster and palm down), with the line running through the cupped fingers.

SPINNING SIDE CAST

Loop Cast

This cast is used to achieve greater distance and less line twist than the side cast. It is slightly more difficult to master but well worth learning.

1. Take the line between the first guide and the reel.

2. Pull down on the line to start the reel spinning and cast the float out forward at the same time.

3. Immediately position the left hand at a right angle (90°) from the face of the reel, while allowing line to flow through the fingers.

4. Using the right hand, stop the reel from spinning at the end of the cast.

WALLIS CAST

Wallis Cast

This is the most difficult cast to master. The Wallis cast allows relatively light tackle to be cast a long distance and eliminates line twist. Once mastered, using this cast becomes a pleasure in of itself. To help reduce over-runs make sure to fill the reel to only half capacity.

1. With the left hand, grip the line between the spool and the first guide.

2. Draw the line down smoothly to start the spool spinning and simultaneously cast the float out forwards.

3. Using the left hand, guide the line back to the reel as the right hand feathers the spool to avoid any overrun.

4. Stop the reel from spinning with the right hand as the float lands.

Last modified onTuesday, 15 October 2013 14:23